* Mobal takes 90% of its profits and directs them into transforming a township in Malawi, Africa.



The 11 Rudest Countries and 16 Friendliest Countries to Visit

france

The Rudest and Friendliest Countries to Visit

Last month I asked you in which countries you’d encountered the friendliest and rudest locals.

But before you read the results, I think everything is best summed up by these 2 answers I received:

“People all over the world will be rude to you if you do not respect them, their culture or their language.”

And

“We’ve found everywhere in the world that If you’re friendly to people, they’ll generally be friendly to you.”

And the fact that France tops both the friendliest and rudest lists, shows it’s all down to personal experience.

And here’s the results of what you sent me (and please excuse the hideously stereotyped images) …

FRIENDLIEST:

1. France

“My husband and I have been to France several times and have NEVER experienced rudeness, nor animosity toward Americans, nor any of those negatives for which France is allegedly famous.
We attempt to speak a little French, for which people are most appreciative, though they usually fall into English to prevent any more fracturing of their language on our part!”

2. Australia

“We just got back from a month in Australia and New Zealand traveling on our own and i must say those Aussies and Kiwis are by far the nicest and friendliest we have met anywhere in the world.”

3. Italy

“Italians are always enjoying life as much as possible and care about everyone around them (except when they are driving!).”

4. Ireland

“But I would now have to say Ireland. We had an accident driving on the Ring of Kerry and ruined a tire and the rim. Our car was un-driveable and we were in the countryside.

We were traveling with another couple and he went walking down the road to see if he could find some help, as there was nothing where we had stopped.

He encountered a gentleman walking his dog, who promptly went home, got his cell phone, called a garage he knew (which we would not have found in a million years).”

5. UK

“If you are an American the English are about as friendly as they come. They always treat you as a long lost relative and really seem to like Americans.”

6. New Zealand

“The friendliest and nicest people in the world live in New Zealand!”

7. Spain

“My offering is Spain. I have traveled quite a bit throughout Europe as well as in South America and Asia – and not just as a tourist. I generally travel alone and whether on business or just wandering, try to interact as much as possible with local people. Without a doubt, in my opinion, Spain ranks as the number 1 country for friendliness.”

8. Mexico

“The friendliest have been in Mexico (Mexico City the friendliest big city I have been to). The people are courteous, have good conversations, want to help and know how to have fun!”

9. Germany

“I have to give the award for friendliest country to Germany. I was driving along the Rhine, taking a detour on my way to Frankfurt, and I stopped frequently along the way. The residents of these small towns were some of the friendliest I’ve met.

They were always anxious to show off their local food and drink, and tell you about the history of their town. Of course, this extended the time of my trip, but the time was well spent.”

10. Slovenia

“But let me not forget Slovenia! Sophisticated, humble, generous and open.”

11. Dominican Republic

“I lived and worked with campesinos in the Dominican Republic for several years, and I found them to be astonishingly generous and friendly to strangers; never rude.

The response, typically, to a ‘gracias’ wasn’t the usual ‘de nada’, but rather ‘a sus ordenes’ (at your service), and that’s how they lived. Even in the cities, people were gracious and cheerful wherever I went.”

12. US

“USA (California coast, Hawaii and small towns). The Pacific coast makes Americans mellow and more helpful.”

13. Canada

“My experience of travel in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and England, dog owners are the friendliest people, regardless of their country of residence.

If a person is walking a dog and you try to strike up a conversation about their dog, dog-lovers can’t resist it. Ooing or ahhhing over someone’s dog is a great way to put even the crankiest person in a better mood.”

14. Thailand

“Michael, as an American living overseas 14 years now and have traveled countries around the globe. I would have to say Thailand is about the friendliest country my wife and I have traveled and Indonesia would be second.”

15. Slovak Republic

“My first pick would be the Slovak Republic, formerly part of Czechoslovakia. I have visited there 7 or 8 times since my first visit in 1970.”

16. Brazil

“However, the friendliest people that I have met around the world are the Brazilians. One evening I was taking a stroll on Copacabana beach with my wife when two lovely young ladies approached us, offering some “personal” services for a slight fee.

When I told then no thanks, I am with my wife, one of them replied, “No problem, we can get someone for her, too.”

But seriously, Brazilians were friendly in every circumstance.”

RUDEST:

1. France

“I went to a restaurant in Orleon, France and had a very difficult time communicating my menu order. The waiter apparently did not know a word of English so, I stumbled thru the menu and ended up pointing to the entre I desired.

The whole time I was ordering, the waiter was mumbling in French. Finally, the meal came and it was very good.

When I paid the check, the waiter responded, in perfect English, “Thank you very much for dining in our restaurant. I hope you visit us on your next trip to France”.

2. UK

“Very rude people!!!! I’m dual UK/USA nationality….”

3. Germany

“Germany: not rude, just cool.”

4. US

“Rudest are New Yorkers”

5. Eygpt

No reason given

6. Switzerland

“Swiss can be downright nasty if they suspect the size of your bank account is puny.”

7. Austria

“We meet so many rude people in Austria.”

8. Puerto Rico

“Puerto Rico gets my vote as the most indifferent, not necessarily rude. Prices are high, tips added on to the check and, lacking incentive, the service is uniformly bad.

So bad that when treated with mediocre service, it sparkles by comparison.”

9. Greece

“We found the rudest people in Greece, beginning with the tour director to Rhodes, Delphi and Meteora. She screamed at us as if she were a drill sergeant.”

10. Sweden

“Least helpful have been the Swedes.”

11. Argentina

“Haughtiest are the Argentines.”

Share your vacation experiences using the Mobal World Phone. Of course, it works in the friendliest countries and the rudest amongst many others…

Did you agree or disagree? Leave a comment on your experiences…






80 thoughts on "The 11 Rudest Countries and 16 Friendliest Countries to Visit"

  • Carole Scutt says:
    June 2, 2008 at 4:16 pm

    The Kenyan people are the most hospitable and caring of any people I have come across and I have traveled to 66 countries and have 16 trips to Africa.


  • Alexander Alenitsch says:
    June 2, 2008 at 3:51 pm

    My consultant job requires me to travel extensively throughout the Caribbean from the lesser to the greater Antillies. I’ve been from Guyana to Dominican Republic. The rudest island people I’ve encountered are from the British Virgin Islands. From the moment you get off the airplane at Beef Island you’re met by a rude Customs and Immigration Officers. One does not feel warm entering BVI. From there, it only gets worse. Service and service personnel are bad and rude respectively. The only somewhat friendly locals I’ve met are the taxi drivers but then again, they have a motive fare plus tip.

    The friendlist island is Barbados. Wonderful people and island. Every trip is enjoyable.

    Alex


  • Re: France, I know many people have had difficult experiences. But even the guy who complained was upset that the waiter didn’t speak English, when he/she herself didn’t speak French. I’ve never been to Paris, but in Alsace the people I met were very nice. I would put Italy and Ireland at the top of the list. I used to hitch hike a lot in Italy for long rides. Without excpetion, whenever soemone stopped for gas or a coffee, they would ask me in and pay for my coffee and or pastry. It never worked to offer ot pay my own or theirs. Even as a guest in their car, they treat you like a guest in their home.


  • Did not see Scotland on the list. Definitely tops my list. I got a flat tire in Stirling and the guys delivering beer came over and offered to fix it. They were like a pit crew at the race track – it was done in about 10 minutes and they would not take any money. Everywhere I went people were so pleasant and hospitable. Also discovered that the older the men were, the more they would flirt – harmless but very fun. I also agree with the overall comment that if you are open to a culture, people and country, you will have good experiences. I’ve been to lots of countries and have never had a bad experience.


    • Hi, I’m from Scotland and do not like classed as British sometimes because of the hate British people get, which is mostly the English that give us the bad reputation! Scotland is a beautiful country compared to England, Less traffic, the cairn gorms and the great Atmosphere in Glasgow + Edinburgh, I live in Aberdeenshire and most of the towns are modern. Unfortunately the weather is very dull and some people get lack of Vitamin D. Scotland also has a population of just over 5million so there is less traffic! If your American, Scottish people will love you due to your accent!


  • Chrisso Boulis says:
    June 2, 2008 at 4:14 pm

    Greece:
    Greek tour directors (licensing / union / what-not are comprable to Greek civil servants. All Greek civil servants are rude, even to other Greeks!


  • Karen Nuckols says:
    June 2, 2008 at 4:29 pm

    I agree that if you are pleasant, people will be pleasant to you in return. I can’t say that we have found a country where even a small percentage of people were rude, and we have done a fair amount of traveling. In traveling, as with any other experience, you can always encounter one or two rude people, but to stereotype a whole country as rude based on the actions of a few would be unfair.

    With regard to Egypt being on the rude list, we found everyone there (in our nearly two weeks in a variety of areas a year ago) very friendly and helpful. Perhaps the need to tip at every turn in the road was interpreted as rudeness, but that is their way.


  • Curt Griggs says:
    June 2, 2008 at 4:33 pm

    To me France is the rudest- I love Holland and Germany- also I was in Greece during December 2007 and I found the people to be very nice and helpful- I was doing disaster relief work back in the mountains and the people were very nice and friendly- I also stayed in Athens and again the people were nice-I plan on going back to Greece for an extended vacation. I also spend some time in China and the people are nice except when in line to buy something or see something-they will step in front of you and give you dirty looks if you say anything-


  • Barry W. Herman says:
    June 2, 2008 at 4:36 pm

    Just back from two weeks in Italy – mostly in Tuscany. We visited many remote spots (all in our rented car) and many of them were accessed only by secondary roads. In Montepulciano, two apparently unoccupied carabinieri escorted us for five miles to a farmhouse we simply could not find – and we had a terrific time with them in fractured Italian and hand signs. Although never really lost at any time (except in Rome), we had to stop frequently for directions and were always met by persons who seemed genuinely interested in helping and who seemed to be be pleased in being able to do so. Started and finished our travels in Rome – our experiences there were somewhat different. My wife and I are native New Yorkers and I can tell you that two things are completely unnecessary in the Big Apple. One is a car and the second is good manners. But I suspect that is true of most large cities.


  • Fred Adriance says:
    June 2, 2008 at 4:47 pm

    I was in the Air Force for 27 years and traveled extensively in Asia, Europe, Africa, The Middle East, and the US. As a ski club president, I’ve led tours in the US, Canada, and Europe. No matter what country I am in, I always approach someone with a hello in the local language and a smile. This even works in New York City. The problem is not rude nationals, it’s rude visitors. I’ve enjoyed every country I’ve visited and there isn’t a place I wouldn’t go back to. All nationalities are friendly given the chance. By the way, I’ve also worked in law enforcement and have no illusions about sensible areas to visit. Try flashing money, acting lost, and wearing expensive jewelery and you’ll probably get mugged in you own home town. Bon Voyage!


  • Clare Atkinson says:
    June 2, 2008 at 4:48 pm

    My granddaughter and I travelled to Egypt in 2006 and we had a great experience.
    We found the people to be very friendly and polite. The people we met always seemed to want go out of their way to be helpful and friendly. Yes, there were a lot of people wanting or expecting tips but if you think about it that’s how they earn a living. I think it all goes back to if you treat people with respect and dignity it will come back to you.


  • I went to Ecuador for the first time in 2006 – it was an absolute joy. The people I met were kind and wonderful, even to a tourist fumbling with barely rudimentary Spanish. I fell in love with this beautiful country.


  • Carol M Rose says:
    June 2, 2008 at 4:59 pm

    In my travels I have found that people reflect your attitude. If you expect rudness, that is what you get. If you project frendliness and interest in their country, that is what is returned. Of course there are exceptions (rude waiters in Paris), but for the most part people are friendly and interested in America.


  • Suzie Frew-Harris says:
    June 2, 2008 at 6:08 pm

    We just got back from our second trip to England and Scotland and last year we also went to Paris. We encountered very helpful and delightful people in all places. Never any rudeness. And in Scotland I wanted a photo of men in kilts and four of them obliged to pose for me as they are extremely proud of their heritage and always willing do to something to put a smile on an American’s face. In Tiverton, England we were arriving at our B&B where some people were outside enjoying themselves having a beer and they even helped us with our baggage and asked us to join their party and they didn’t even work there! Next year we are going back to Paris, and visiting Barcelona and Italy for the first time. We feel confident we will encounter wonderful people.

    Suzie


  • The Dutch in Amsterdam are the nicest people in Europe! I’ve wandered the streets alone at 2:00 in the morning and it’s such a clean and safe place. I love the Dutch!


  • Roger Cullen says:
    June 2, 2008 at 6:38 pm

    We’ve been all over France several times and we’ve been treated very well over many years. The one exception was the American Airlines ticket counter person a couple of years ago in Paris-Aeroport Roissy, who was haughty. It is our favorite country. I got a laugh from the comment about the waiter from “Orleon.” Not only did he not understand that French people often speak French; he couldn’t even spell the name of the place in which he was treated so “rudely.”


  • Catherine Speth says:
    June 2, 2008 at 6:39 pm

    I did not see Portugal on the list of friendliest. I traveled in Lisbon knowing no Portugese and still felt welcome and treated with great hospitality.


  • Joe Favaro says:
    June 2, 2008 at 6:46 pm

    Australia and New Zealand were terrific. The people there made me feel like a long lost relative who had come home.


  • Leigh Lingard says:
    June 2, 2008 at 7:08 pm

    I’ve been to most of the countries mentioned in both lists & Sth. Korea, Japan & Hong Kong. All were very welcoming (esp. the Japanese), the only ones I would put on the Rude list would be the local pedestrians in Hong Kong


  • I’ve been to Italy 3 times. The fid=rst 2 visits were tours. The last time we went, we rented villas through Parker Villas. We met the most generous people. Our first villa was outside Verona. The owner, an older man (and his younger wife), was always ready to pour a glass of wine or direct us to a restaurant or other destination. A relative of a friend drove 2 hours to pick us up, show us the Amalfi coast, took us to his home for a 5 course meal, then drove us back! What a warm, beautiful country with people to match!


  • Bruce Stenman says:
    June 2, 2008 at 7:51 pm

    I differentiate between the people one meets on the street and the people providing service in hotels and restaurants, and people driving in cars. Overall I have had the most problems dealing with hotels and restaurant personnel in France, especially in Paris and the fewest problems in Germany by way of contrast.

    Friendliest people as a whole I have encountered in Cambodia. Even toward people from the USA, a country that dropped more bombs on their country then we did on Japan during WW II, not to mention leaving behind millions of land mines to maim and kill future generations of Cambodians. Their culture’s Buddhist base really comes through in many ways.

    In terms of drivers the least friendly and most aggressive are in my native state of California. No country in Europe or Asia begins to compare with the poor driving manners of Americans – we are really in a “class” of our own in this regard.


  • I have traveled throughout North and Central America, Europe, and Africa. I have found that even in the places most noted for the rudeness of their inhabitants, a big friendly smile, an attempt to speak a few words in the native language, and the ability to laugh at yourself go A LONG WAY towards eliciting kindness from anyone anywhere. Paris, NYC, and London are often cited as filled with rude, uncaring people. NOT the case!! The inhabitants of these cities are among the kindest I’ve ever encountered. I guess the old saying “what goes around, comes around” is true in any tongue.
    Linda


  • Little Rachel says:
    June 2, 2008 at 9:46 pm

    I sing with a band. I travel in Europe often, and have never really encountered much rudeness in any European country. I will say that Finland tops my list as friendliest. Fins are always extremely accomodating and treat me like family when I am visiting. Scandinavia, in general is friendly. I have also had particularly good experiences in Germany and France. Although I find the Dutch to be a little crazy, the Netherlands is a very friendly country as well. The rudest people, by far, in my experience, are Americans.


  • Bill Ortwein says:
    June 2, 2008 at 9:03 pm

    I agree with Slovak Republic as the friendliest country. During our trip to the Slovak Republic, everyone in that country seemed to be interested in making our trip an excellent experience. Any question or issue was addressed immediately. Meals were delicious; prices were very reasonable and service was great.


  • My first six hours (out of 24 hours) in Budapest, Hungary, in March, 2008, were my worst travel experience in my lifetime of 67 years. It was such a nightmare that I will never set foot in that city or country again, will never spend another filthy florin in that despicable place and will never travel through the place if there’s any way to avoid it. They have permanently lost my tourist business. It was worse than my 72 hours in Italy in 1979. That was almost 30 years ago, and I’ve never been back.

    Thanks to the indifference, incompetence, abuse and outright extortion of the people we encountered in “service” roles, it took us 5-1/2 hours to get to a hotel that was a 15 minute bus ride from the airport; and traveling to that hotel cost us close to $100.00 — a trip that should have cost about $5.00 (total for two people) round-trip.

    For a country that supposedly gave up communism a couple of decades ago or so, culturally and bureaucratically, it still operates as if it were a communist country. I pity the poor, long-suffering, Hungarian people. The ordinary people in the street that we encountered were wonderfully kind, thoughtful, and tried to help. But the others ruin it for them, and I’ll never set foot there again.

    On top of everything else, the subway system was a sewer, and a really scary place overall. I’m totally and permanently disgusted.


  • I think you are right. France wins both “good” and “bad”. People in Paris are the rudest is have met…. but get 20 miles outside Paris and people are very friendly. I have been to Paris 8 or 9 times and am not going back…but we vacationed in other parts of France last year and had a great time.

    I also have had several rude experiences in Japan. Many smaller restuarants refuse to serve “Americans”.


  • Dale Simmons says:
    June 3, 2008 at 12:25 am

    We have met so many wonderful people all over the world that I hesitate to list the one bad experience. I believe the secret to the wonderful way people have treated us has been the fact that we always try to speak a few words in the native language. Even our one bad experience in France was probably because we could not communicate in their language and did not understand their custom. Late one evening we wanted just a small snack and three of us ordered one large pizza. We were refused service unless we each ordered a pizza. Finally they did allow us to order one pizza provided we took it outside to eat it. We were appropriately dressed, polite and are good tippers. Counter that with the many wonderful experiences we have had traveling in France, eating at other restaurants, riding trains, etc. I think that we have learned from our travels, and we have traveled in all the countries you mention except two, that we should attempt to communicate with visitors to our country (USA), try to be friendly, helpful and thank them for the wonderful experiences we have had while viaiting their country.


  • Phil Dolberg says:
    June 3, 2008 at 1:00 am

    We just came back from two weeks in Sweden and found them very friendly and helpful. I would go back in a minute, or just as soon as the dollar regains strength.


  • Jan Zimmerman says:
    June 3, 2008 at 1:32 am

    As one can see from the replies, many have had bad and good experiences in the same place. My most embarrassing moment was in Avignon, France. We were dining on a terrace. A couple from New York was seated several tables away and had told us they had stayed in Avignon during the Summer for the last 4 years. When the waiter came to take their order, they handed him printed index cards with French phrases to communicate with him. In 4 years they had not made the effort to learn any French. We could see the waiter, who was so respectful to us, cringe. Talk about an ugly American. I speak, read and write respectable French (minored in College over 40 years ago) and am so glad that I can communicate in their native language. I also speak extensive Italian (mostly self-taught) because we travel there frequently. When on a recent African safari, I took the time to learn around a dozen phrases. The citizens love it when you talk to them in their language and have been quite complimentary of us.


  • Robert Tyabji says:
    June 3, 2008 at 3:30 am

    My wife and I have traveled widely and lived and worked in many countries. We have realized that the majority of people everywhere are good, honest and well meaning human beings who will be helpful, generous and hospitable when one is polite or shows respect for them and their culture, and when there’s a genuine need. However, people can appear to be rude because of communication issues. For example, in some cultures, a laugh does not necessarily indicate mirth or derision, but nervousness or uncertainty. Head movements in greeting or acknowledging agreement can be construed by foreigners as being aggressive or contrary. So let’s reserve judgement and learn more about the people we’re visiting.


  • I think one of the most important things to do when traveling is to learn a little of the language before you go. If an American even attempts to speak the local language, I believe they realize what a huge effort it is for us monoglots, and almost all people respond happily….even if they don’t speak English, they will make a greater attempt to communicate with gestures,etc…and suddenly everyone becomes friendly. I truly believe to travel comfortably you must understand the culture before you go….if you expect everyone to behave as Americans you will be disappointed, and possibly act rudely yourself in your host country thereby causing some rudeness in return…..travel is about experienceing places different than ours.


  • Karen Sandness says:
    June 3, 2008 at 1:50 pm

    I’ve found that people all over the world reflect YOUR attitude toward them. Years ago, when I was a teenager, my family took a trip to Europe. At the time, there were a lot of artiles in the U.S. press about how unfriendly the French were. However, both my father and I spoke some French, and we found people largely helpful and friendly, with the exception of one souvenir seller near the Eiffel Tower, who was probably just having a bad day. The rest of the family, who didn’t speak a word of French, had neutral or bad experiences.

    I find it incredible that people sometimes take off for a foreign country without reading up on it or learning any of the language. Buying a $25 guidebook and reading it thoroughly helps you understand some of the cultural differences and avoid misunderstandings and unintentional rudeness.

    In addition, learning a few words of your host country’s language shows respect for its residents. Even in countries where “everybody speaks English,” I always learn how to say, “Do you speak English?” in the local language. These days, it’s easy to find audio familiarization courses and podcasts for the world’s major languages, and you can buy recorded materials for just about any language in the world online, so if you can afford to go overseas, there’s no excuse for not spending an extra $30 or so to learn a few phrases.

    Quite often the people who claim that “everyone” in a foreign country was rude are people who go over with a superior attitude or a chip on their shoulder. I’ve met friendly and rude people all over the world and all over the U.S.


  • Charles Rogers says:
    June 3, 2008 at 2:06 pm

    I was sorry to hear Barbara had such a bad time in Budapest,My wife and I spent almost a week there last year,We found the people very helpful and friendly.
    The subways were very clean,the restaurants and servers very polite, and the food was excelent.
    We look forward to going back very soon.


  • Virginia Kamke says:
    June 3, 2008 at 3:21 pm

    France can go either way. The positives outdo the negatives, even though many believe the French are rude.

    Argentines are friendly. The residents of Buenos Aires are known to think they are superior , but the rest of the Argentines are very friendly. In fact, in BA, they were very friendly to Americans (at least to us!!!)


  • We have traveled in many of the countries listed. By far the friendliest was Australia. The people were always striking up a conversation with us. They really wanted to know what we thought of their country and were interested in the USA. Perhaps it is because there were no language barriers. I have visited New York City many times and have always found New Yorkers to be helpful, not rude at all!
    I think the rudest treatment we have received has been in Germany. Our heritage is German. In fact I am often mistaken for German when we travel. I understand, though, that once the Germans get to know you they are very kind.


  • I have to defend the French. We spent two weeks there a couple of years ago and everyone was universally friendly and helpful. Several times in the Paris Metro, when we looked confused, a local would offer advice, in English without our even having to ask. We also witnessed a young woman trying to pull a huge rolling suitcase up the steps in the Metro and a young man, unasked, grabbed another handle and lifted it up the steps for her. We don’t speak fluent French, but we practice out phrasing and our attempt to speak the local language is appreciated and usually reciprocated by the French switching to English.

    A country that also has lovely, warm local folks is Costa Rica. Ticos just naturally smile when greeted with an Hola!

    The Irish are wonderful friends of the “Yanks” and the way they speak the language is poetic.

    We’ve traveled to many other countries including Chile, Agentina, England, Scotland, and all over the Caribbean and have found that if one is friendly towards the locals, they treat you likewise.


  • Without hesitation, my response for the most friendly people would be Jamaica. That is why so many of the all-inclusive resorts are based there. “No problem mon” is not just a saying; it is a way of life. IRIE means “good feelings” in Jamaican and that is what you will have if you go there.


  • Many Americans misinterpret the aloofness of French (Parisian) waiters as rudeness. Unlike the US, where restaurant workers are often temporary workers earning minimum wage, in France service personnel are professionals, and they expect their clients to treat them with the respect their station deserves. If customers don’t, they are treated with disdain.


  • Alicia Hooben says:
    June 8, 2008 at 11:13 am

    Austrailia hands down is the friendliest place. Not only are the Austrailians friendly and helpful but they are so earth friendly as well. Sydney was such a clean clean city. Cairns also was so welcoming from our taxi driver to our hotel staff everyone was wonderful. Now after Austrailia we stopped in Tahiti for a few days. There we found very rude hotel staff. Very slow, no attention to detail service. The beauty of the place does make up for all of it!


  • Sandra Bravo says:
    June 8, 2008 at 12:30 pm

    We (family) have travelled around the world, and agree that definetely French from PARIS area are the worst, but not so for the rest, even if one or them do not speak the language (English, Spanish or French).

    Puerto Rico is my home country, yet our people 99% of the time go all out for newcomers, yet I recognize that service in restaurants is an area we are lagging behind. SOrry on behalf of PR people who do care.


  • Kay Carswell says:
    June 25, 2008 at 3:47 am

    We just returned from a month in Sicily and Greece, including Crete, Santorini, and mainland Greece. Contrary to other opinions here, we found the Greeks to be quite friendly, even in Athens — not only the hotel personnel but the taxi drivers, store clerks, and men-on-the-street were considerate and friendly. On the other hand, we found Sicilians to be among the rudest people we’ve ever encountered in our 30 years of international travel. And it wasn’t our attitude that caused the rudeness — they are rude to each other, shouting, pushing, etc. (There were, of course, exceptions, and we found exactly 3 Sicilians who were friendly, helpful and dignified.) The driving is insane, drivers showing absolutely no regard for the other driver nor for traffic laws. “Wait your turn” doesn’t compute whether on the highway or the sidewalk. Waiters are at best disinterested and at worst hostile.

    It would be hard to say which country is the friendliest, but we have had good experiences in France, England, Ireland, and Croatia. I think Croatia surprised us the most with their enthusiasm toward visitors.


  • Italians are by far one of the rudest nations on the planet. Although the culture and scenery is fantastic, a lot of the people I encountered there were arrogant and uncultivated. The three occasions in which I visited the country, I couldn’t walk down the street without being barged into at least a dozen times on a daily basis. They also seem to have no concept of queueing- proven by the fact they’ll casually and unashamedly push in front of you in any given queue. Also a word of warning to young women-there is no end to male chauvanism in Italy. You can’t walk down the street without being heckled or beeped at by piggish motorists, or having random men on the sreet yelling patronising remarks at you in English.


  • I Have traveled quite a bit and I live in the USA. I actually think that we here in the USA are the rudest people. We complain about everything and about everybody else, for any little thing people call the police, we have allot of people that do not know how to behave in public and that is why we have all these laws that we cannot drink in public, like a beach because people do not know how to behave and then make a mess or start fights with other people. People from the south call the North Yankees and the north call southerners red necks, people in Florida call the people who live there seasonal snow birds, yes I think the USA ranks very high in being rude, and uncivilized.
    I think people with other countries like European countries are actually more friendlier, I find that people in Holland, Austria, Germany, Spain and Portugal to be pretty friendly and also people form the Caribbean islands and S.America like Brazil to also be very friendly.
    That is my take. Resume


  • The Greeks are rude? I found the Greeks to be very friendly, not to mention good looking!:-) I’m from the United States and believe It really depends on the way you treat people and your attitude, or state of mind upon visiting a particular country.


  • Germany is the RUDEST country! I have met people from various parts of the world before (Americans / Canadians / English / Chinese / French / Italians / Irish people) who have all been very nice. However, on several occasions, I have also met German people and I would have to say that I have received the WORST treatment by these people. They are considerably very rude and selfish, and do not seem to tolerate anyone who is different from themselves. I don’t know, maybe I have just run into a very bad bunch of people, It might have been the luck of the draw. However, after the treatment I got from these people, they are my #1 for the rudest people.


  • Reading all these comments reminds that you can come across good and bad in every country. However, I thinks it’s important to realise there are also regional differences within countries.For example I generally love in Italy, but rcently went to Salentino area (the heel of Italy)and with some exceptions found the people indifferent and unhelpful at best and arrogant and unfriendly at worst. This I’ve never encountered before not even in other parts of the South. This may also be because there is relatively less wealth than in the North.
    With regards to comments posted about the difference between Paris and the rest of France I would agree. People are friendlier outside of Paris but even there one can generalise too much. I found Besancon in the east of the country to be one of the least friendly places in the country.


  • Why isn’t India (my country!) included on the kindest people list?


  • Chile!

    Well, I am biased about this one because I lived there for two and a half months, but I can tell you that the people are very friendly and very helpful. I lived in a small town and was always greeted with smiles. Beautiful country and beautiful people!


  • A friend and I spent two weeks in England last year- a week in London and one in the countryside, around Nottingham and also in Wiltshire – and we were just amazed at how friendly everyone we met was. I was especially astonished in London, since I’d heard Londoners tend to be on the rude side. If we were looking at a map, someone would ALWAYS stop and see if they could help us. My friend had a horrible outsized monster suitcase (learned “pack lightly” the hard way!) and I can’t tell you how many people on the tube helped her cart that thing up staircases. We’re in our late 40s, too, not cute little teenagers!

    When we landed at JFK on our return home, it was obvious we were back in America. Everyone we encountered was horrifically rude.

    As for the “rude” waiter in France, it does help if you at least make an effort to speak the language when you are visiting another country. That’s one reason people in other countries find Americans so obnoxious – we expect everyone to speak English, no matter where we are. Very arrogant.


  • Shannon McIntyre says:
    November 30, 2011 at 3:06 pm

    New Zealand people are by far the rudest.


  • Lmao!New Zealand on friendly list?The rudest country is New Zealand .And they r ugly.


  • ? You Will Never Know says:
    January 15, 2012 at 4:09 am

    My family says French are serious jerks. I am nt saying my family is. I agree a lot of people in the US are the New Yorkers. Peace out.


  • usa is the rudest country in term of driving on freways


  • australia is the friendliest country


  • Wilber Hollett says:
    March 11, 2012 at 2:00 am

    Don’t simply retire from something; have something to retire to.
    Simply a monopolist could study a company and ruin it by giving away products.


  • Diane Gordon says:
    March 12, 2012 at 10:25 pm

    Nobody has mentioned Moroccans? They are not only friendly, they are extremely generous. Learn a little Moroccan Arabic, and they will love you. Even Americans.
    I’ve been here two months, and don’t want to go back to the US. One thing that is creepy about meeting Americans
    is that they size you up before giving you the time of day.


  • Czechs are easily the most rude in Europe. They will even go to great lengths to defend their rudeness by saying “its ridiculous to ask for help in a store from a clerk, as you should figure it out for yourself”. Unlike Berlin where everybody bikes on the streets, in Prague very few do. Why? The young Czech male drivers will literally run you over and drive on! I am not exaggerating. Crazy, aggressive drivers who think thinks the roads are ONLY for cars. They are also known for very rude service in restaurants and stores. “Don’t like the food? Then get out!” is the implicit motto in a Czech restaurant. If you stop and aks a stranger for directions there is a very good chance they will look at you strangely and just walk away from you! This has happened to me here many times. Contrast this callous indifference to Berlin: I visited there last Fall and pulled out a map to figure out where I was…didn’t ask anybody for any help—and 2 Germans immediately came up to me and asked “can I help you find where you are going?” I immediately knew I wasn’t in Czech Republic LOL. So why am I living in Prague then, you may wonder. The good qualities to living in CZ include: EXCELLENT beer at the lowest prices (cheaper than a coke!), affordable, and Prague is a very beautiful city—-wasn’t levelled during WWII like the rest of Europe was.


  • I have to agree with zam, took a trip to Prague studied the basics of their language before I went tried to use it during my stay but to no avail. Most of the Czechs were either indifferent to me or rude, stopped and asked a young czech couple for directions the guy was helpful and friendly but his girlfriend put her hand up to my face.Oh and beware of the little pub/cafes in the city center, they charged me $70 for a glass of beer and a soup. On the bright side the sites were breathtaking and I did manage to meet a friendly czech couple who helped me navigate the metro system. My advice spend more of your time in Krakow,Poland where the locals want to speak english and have a much warmer vibe.


  • Surely the Brazil. You will always welcome it, will always have someone inviting you to leave, to take a swim, sleeping in his house, to shake his hand and hug you and not even know you well.
    just be careful with the bandits, there is much violence in Brazil (and worldwide).


  • Traveljunkie says:
    June 3, 2012 at 10:53 pm

    Friendliest – New Zealand and USA
    Rudest – possibly Morocco! Sorry


  • A most interesting topic, but none of these countries top the list of the rudest country or group of people in the world.

    I work for a company run by Indian entrepreneurs based out of the U.S. and have travelled to India extensively.

    I can confirm that India is the rudest and ugliest culture in the world. Pakistan not far behind. Most people I know and have met, are indeed not big fans of Indian people, but why is that? Is it their color? Their food? Their mannerisms? Nope, none of that. Here’s the truth that a lot of Americans do not know about.

    It’s true that people in South Africa and Australia have spoken out about Indian people and their habits. They are generally hated in those countries. People’s dislike for Indians isn’t so much the colour of their skin like I said, it’s mostly about the attitudes and behaviour of Indians. The common complaints are that Indians are arrogant, overtly self-serving and self-promoting, overly talkative (not allowing others to get a word in edgewise), greedy and unreliable (in terms of putting their interest above all else, despite any assurances to the contrary). Based on working with them for 6 years now, I have to say all of the above is true. I have spent a lot of time in Hyperabad and Bangalore. I have to say that I personally find Indians generally too competitive and self-promoting; based on my encounters at the workplace, travels and those I deal with daily, and even in social settings.

    Even if I acknowledge that meeting a few unpleasant Indians does not an entire unpleasant race make, I am personally aware that I appear to be racist. The thing is, I started out being neutral towards Indians, based on having overseas-born Indians as friends and generally finding overseas-born Indians quite normal, decent, folk. I was, in fact, quite surprised by the behavior of the Indians I met, and was reluctant to see a trend (as I fancied myself a non-racist). And while this could purely be anecdotal, many people I’ve met in the service industry (cafe or restaurant waitresses, airline hostesses, hotel staff etc) tell me that the customers who’re from India tend to be the most demanding, rude and unappreciative customers. They said that this got worse with the more high-powered Indians, like bankers and business people. Most Americans and Europeans from our company who deal with our Indian counterparts in the U.S. and in India find the same trends I do. We are frankly tired of dealing with Indians and their ways.

    But when the second Indian turned out very similar to the first, and then the third, and then the fourth, it’s hard not to form a sort of view. Strangely, my acquaintances and friends who dislike Indians share this experience; they hate to admit that they dislike Indians (some of them make sure to qualify that they don’t dislike Indians in general, but simply have been unlucky to meet unpleasant Indians)……..but they mostly find that they have not been impressed by the Indians they’ve met, and that they were surprised by how unpleasant they were. Even the overseas-born Indian friends I have dislike Indians from India, and not because of the caste system. I then realised that this was down to the huge cultural gap between Indians from India, and the rest of the world. That such behaviour on the part of Indians from India must not be construed as negative in India, and that people from elsewhere see it as negative, when because of the circumstances in India, it is considered normal.

    And most of us were quite embarrassed and surprised by our admission, when we talked about it. Many of us appreciate Indian history, culture, films, food and its vital contributions to the world, but we are often at a loss for words when we meet so many Indians from India who seem to only be interested in boasting or dominating a conversation, or who think nothing of fawning at the workplace. As I mentioned above, I strongly believe that skin colour or poverty has anything to do with the matter. My own view on the matter is that the caste system has led to a very strong sense of persecution for many Indians, who freed from that sort of oppression overseas, tend to overcompensate. As I don’t understand Indian culture enough, I was hoping you could help me understand the cultural differences, or basis for the behaviour of Indians. Perhaps, I’m really racist (just in self-denial), but I really hope I’m not one!


  • Recently, I found a survey of the rudest countries, with most of the participants being British, that said that the some of rudest countries were France, Russia, United Kingdom, China and the United States, and that the least rude countries are Brazil, The Philippines, Japan, etc. I essentially agree with Russia, china, Japan, USA, and maybe France. However, here in the Philippines people are extremely rude and a little stupid, and I haven’t gone to France or brazil yet, though the former is going solely by reputation.


  • Rafi last one says:
    August 15, 2012 at 6:18 am

    The friendliest country and people’s are in Costa Rica., Brazil, Holland and Israel. On the next level, there is Peru, Denmark, Norway and South Africa. I also want to include Morocco, USA, Canada and Italy. Countries with lots of music in the street are bound to be friendlier and in better dispositions.


  • Hands down US immigration is the worst. Especially so are the immigration officers that are Hispanic. US Immigration are better and usually much more polite at the Canadian border and at Toronto airport. I’m a CANADIAN with a US green card and everytime my pont of entry is at an airport in the USA I leave upset after the experience.


  • You should not judge a peoples’ friendliness solely by the way they treat tourists. Tourists are generally well treated wherever they go. Another friendliness measure is how people in that country treat each other on a day to day basis. In my travels I’ve found some interesting contrasts, like the French which sometimes treat tourists like crap but on the other hand are friendly with each other, or the Portuguese which are extremely friendly with tourists but often are extremely uncivil with each other.


  • Tirshatha Edelman says:
    December 6, 2012 at 6:08 pm

    CHINA has the rudest people by far!!! MAYBE travelers don’t notice it but leave the nice hotel, let the polite translator have a day off or learn Manderine & you will find that they are really truly the rudest, most blunt, coarse, crude, uneducated(morally), impolite people you will have met yet. They will completely ignore your presence & start a conversation with the person your talking to. They are dis-honest, They rudely push their way threw a crowd to the front of a line. They never say please or thank you & REALLY mean it. They will quite frankly ask you why you are not rich, so fat, ugly, stinky, or poorly dressed. They will TELL you, not ask you to do something such as “turn your cell phone to silent!” or “call the other government office number!” or “go to our website!” etc…….. .I have heard that the Vietnamese are not too much different when it comes to coarse, crude, blunt, & impolite but all I know is that they (Vietnamese) are REALLY noisy, love money & wear questionable attire as in if you saw them on the street you’d think they were looking for a night partner(we have many friends that have Vietnamese wives). China is my number 1 when it comes to “MOST RUDE COUNTRY” ( I am American living in Taiwan for over 20 year).


  • See, I’ve always felt the same way about Canadian immigration post 9/11. Truly rude and sooo suspicious. Once I was asked why I was wearing a coat when it wasn’t cold. It was 60 degrees outside. I said, “I’m cold! I’m from California!” He acted as though I was a drug mule or something.


  • Australia! By far the most arrogant, agressive, abusive, rude and soul-less people in the world. From the moment you hop off the plane, you will experience their total lack of care for their fellow human beings. I have lived here for 36 years and travelled to 20 different countries. Try driving in a major australian city. The horn is only used in aggression after the event. The amount of times I have been threatened with violence and sometimes even assulted just minding my own business. Australia has the higest per capita drug uses in the world, so I guess that doesn’t help things. Also for more than 200 years australia has been used as a dumping ground for the world’s criminals. My god people, wake up ,….Australia is NOT a paradise!!!!


    • I have to agree with you. Australia is the worst. Never have I met people like that anywhere else I have gone. Italy is by far the best. Everyone treats you like you’re part of their family.


  • I have also travelled quite a bit in different parts of the world.
    I am not being biased to my country but Zambians are the friendliest people on this planet. Mainly due to their belief in Jesus Christ the Kindest man to have lived on the Planet.
    I know their can be many kind nations out there and you all may have varyng opinions about any nation i point due to historical reasons but in my own estimation i found the brits in the UK to be about the best people you can find, they are frank yes and direct yes and thats a good thing as honesty is crucial and they also mind their own business generally unless it borders on certain fundamental principles.
    However and to their credit they value humans better than most of us do and respect peoples rights more than the rest of us. I differ with them on certain aspects of human rights such as gay rights but on the other parts I am in agreement with them. And they have championed difficult causes for the good of poor people across the world. Congrats Britain and England in particular.


  • I have been living in Brazil for 5 months now, and it has been the worst experience of my life. The people are rude, almost behond comprehension. I read that they are friendly, not true, only false. I recomend not visiting there, I hope to return to the UK ASAP!!!


  • I visited amsterdam a few years ago i had no problems with the hotel the service was great . The coffee shops depending where you went if your american the service varies. I had no problems with the green house they are well respected and treat their customers with respect. The drunks walking around can be pretty annoying when they find out your a tourist but nothing aggitated me more then when people asked me where i was from and when i said new york their attitudes changed. I guess new yorkers arent liked much in other countries no matter how nice an respectful you are. I got into an argument with people across the street from my hotel window when a girl was asking us questions a male friend of hers heard we were new yorkers didnt believe us till showing a ny yankee hat and almost immediately the guy pulled the girl from the window, she later returned drunk shouting from the window to get our attention. The guy comes back over and rudely demanded us to stop talking to the girl. Maybe it was she was drunk but his attitude towards us shouldve been directed at the girl. Not my fault you let her drink and she wants to flirt with other guys then him. Oh well i still had fun visiting an want to go again.


  • Yeah, the airport US Customs officers are the worst. I feel so bad for foreign tourists who are
    anxious to begin their trip and then are treated like criminals by these thugs in uniform.
    Most are just burned-out. They hate their jobs and take it out on people they think they
    can bully. They can’t do anything else in life and take out their misery on people who are
    more successful then they are.

    I was reading that some tourists will go elsewhere on holiday rather than going to the US
    and being mistreated by airport US Customs.

    I dread going overseas because I have to deal with these losers when I return.

    After my month-long trip to Australia I had to go through this with US Customs:

    Them: You mean to tell me that you just spent a month in Australia and all you took
    was that little bag?
    Me: I learned in the Marines to travel light.
    Them: Yeah, well how yould you like me to search that bag?
    Me: Go ahead. There’s nothing in there but a bunch of dirty underwear.

    The idiot “let me go.”

    So, when you arrive in the US take a deep breath. Expect to be treated like a dog.
    Take another deep breath when they allow you to leave and try to enjoy your trip.

    Sorry for all of this. Most Americans are friendly toward tourists. We value all of you.


  • avital saddi says:
    March 29, 2013 at 12:19 am

    I must say that Lebanon and Israel beat all the others in joie de vivre e savoir faire.


  • I totaly agree with you about Slovenians! I’m so glad someone rated them friendly because when I was there, they always offered things to keep us comfortable and even the guy from border control (working at the Slovenian-Craotian border) told us to have a great time at he even gave us travel guides and pamphlets for free to help us out! Slovenians are great! :)

    Although, I find the Greek and the Austrians very friendly! I guess we both have different experiences and we met different people so it’s hard to say which is right. :)


  • FRANCE …. sorry, but they are so slow and rude people !! this guy was eager to paint us in his stupid canvas and we rejected him then he started shouting at us in french. -.-


  • I only liked the negative parts lol. 11 rudest countries. Yes, I’m American and New Yorkers are full of ugly ratass ugly butt-looking people.


  • I have to disagree with Greece being a rude country, my husband and I have ben there several times and the people were wonderful and very talkative.


  • I’ve hitchhiked throughout America, Canada, many places in Europe …and found the friendliness of Australians to be beyond compare. In the Sydney airport I asked an older fellow for directions to the train station; he and his wife invited me to stay with them for three days until my transcontinental train departed, gave me guided tours of the city, and treated me like a long-lost son. Friendliness was pervasive throughout Australia. I was often invited to stay at people’s homes. I had similar experiences in New Zealand; the people are absolute gems, both in the city and country.



Leave a response

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:
<a href=" " title=" " rel=" "> <abbr title=" "> <acronym title=" "> <b> <blockquote cite=" "> <cite> <code> <del datetime=" "> <em> <i> <q cite=" "> <strike> <strong>